1 - 12 of 15 results
Weighing the Evidence for a Mass Extinction: In the Ocean

This activity supports concepts covered in the short filmThe Day the Mesozoic Died by replicating observations and measurements made by researchers of fossilized protists, called foraminifera (or forams), below and above the K-T boundary.

Following the Trail of Evidence

In this activity, students identify and explain the evidence presented in the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died that led to the discovery that an asteroid struck Earth about 66 million years ago, causing a mass extinction.

Learning from Past Extinctions

In this talk, biologist Anthony Barnosky discusses Earth’s five mass extinctions and whether current species declines may be part of a sixth mass extinction.

Interactive Assessment for The Day the Mesozoic Died

Several questions are embedded within the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died, which tells the story of the scientific quest to explain one of the greatest, long-standing scientific mysteries: the sudden disappearance of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period.

Teaching Evolution Using Lizards and Tetrapods

This playlist can be used to teach several core topics in evolution by exploring examples of lizard species evolution and the effects of mass extinctions on tetrapod evolution. It can be used in undergraduate biology courses.

The Day the Mesozoic Died

This film tells the story of the scientific quest to explain one of the greatest, long-standing scientific mysteries: the sudden disappearance of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period.

Activity for The Day the Mesozoic Died

This activity explores the research described in the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died. The film traces the uncovering of key clues revealing that an asteroid struck Earth 66 million years ago, triggering a mass extinction.

Chemical Signatures of Asteroid Impacts

This activity allows students to analyze the chemical data that led researchers to conclude that a layer of clay at the boundary between the Cretaceous and Paleogene rock layers (the K-Pg boundary) contained an extraordinary concentration of iridium.

Calculating Iridium Fallout From an Asteroid Impact

This activity allows students to calculate how much iridium was released, and eventually deposited all over the Earth, by the impact of an asteroid that struck Earth 66 million years ago. It supports concepts presented in the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died.