1 - 12 of 36 results
ATP Synthesis

This animation shows how the proton gradient across the mitochondrial membrane powers the ATP synthase enzyme to make ATP. It is the third of three animations about cellular respiration.

Electron Transport Chain

This animation shows how the enzyme complexes of the electron transport chain harvest energy from cofactor molecules to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane and establish a chemical gradient. It is the second of three animations about cellular respiration.

Citric Acid Cycle

This animation shows the reactions of the citric acid cycle, which splits off carbon atoms and generates energy-rich reduced forms of cofactor molecules. It is the first of three animations about cellular respiration.

The Science of an Extreme Animal Athlete

This video follows biologist Shane Campbell-Staton, who is studying the adaptations that allow deer mice living at high elevations to stay warm and active during the winter.

Photosynthesis

This multipart animation series explores the process of photosynthesis and the structures that carry it out.

Cystic Fibrosis Mechanism and Treatment

This animation shows how mutations in an ion channel protein lead to the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. The animation also discusses how research on this protein has been used to develop treatments for the disease.

Animated Life: Mary Leakey

This animated short video illustrates the life and work of paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey, including her discovery of the Laetoli footprints.

Your Inner Monkey

This film explores what human hands, vision, and brains reveal about our evolution from ancient primate ancestors.

The Biology of Skin Color

This film explores the hypothesis that different tones of skin color in humans arose as adaptations to the intensity of ultraviolet radiation in different parts of the world.

The Tool-Making Animal

This video describes how stone tools reveal a critical transition in the lives of our early human ancestors.

Animated Life: Pangea

This animated short video celebrates the early 20th-century German astronomer and atmospheric scientist Alfred Wegener, who first proposed that continents once formed a single landmass and had drifted apart.