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Scientist Role Models

In this activity, students find a scientist with whom they can relate in some way and then explore and reflect upon the impact of that scientist’s work.

Wildebeest Populations

This activity explores an image of a wildebeest herd on the Serengeti, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about population dynamics and wildlife management.

Patterns of Predation

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated how herbivore populations are regulated in the Serengeti.

Serengeti: Nature’s Living Laboratory

This film explores the foundational research in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, that uncovered many of the ecological principles that govern how animal populations and communities are regulated.

Mozambique Mounds

This activity explores an image of termite mounds in the African savanna, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about ecosystems, competition, and feedback loops.

Skin Color and Human Evolution

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated genetic factors contributing to skin color differences, particularly within African populations.

Why Two Heads?

This activity explores images of planarians regenerating missing body parts, which serve as phenomena for learning about cell division and differentiation.

The Search for a Mutated Gene

This video describes the case of a patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a progressive disease that leads to blindness, and how physician-scientist Dr. Ed Stone approached the search for the causal mutation.

Modeling Trophic Cascades

In this activity, students model trophic cascades, which are also explored in a variety of related resources, using cards of animal and plant species from seven different habitats.

Trophic Cascades in Salt Marsh Ecosystems

In this video, ecologist Brian Silliman explains how he uses manipulative field experiments to study salt marsh ecosystems. His approach revealed that these systems are under top-down control from consumers and predators.