1 - 12 of 17 results
Written in Chalk

This activity explores images of chalk formations and coccolithophores, which serve as phenomena for learning about the interactions between biological and geological processes.

EarthViewer

This interactive module allows students to explore the science of Earth's deep history, from its formation 4.5 billion years ago to modern times.

Animated Life: Pangea

This animated short video celebrates the early 20th-century German astronomer and atmospheric scientist Alfred Wegener, who first proposed that continents once formed a single landmass and had drifted apart.

Stratigraphic Principles

This video provides a demonstration of two main principles in the study of rock layers: superposition and association.

Chemical Signatures of Asteroid Impacts

This activity allows students to analyze the chemical data that led researchers to conclude that a layer of clay at the boundary between the Cretaceous and Paleogene rock layers (the K-Pg boundary) contained an extraordinary concentration of iridium.

Distribution of Elements in Earth’s Crust

In this activity, students read a passage about how planets in our solar system formed and why the element iridium is so rare in Earth’s crust. They then answer questions about the information presented, testing their non-fiction reading comprehension.

Calculating Iridium Fallout From an Asteroid Impact

This activity allows students to calculate how much iridium was released, and eventually deposited all over the Earth, by the impact of an asteroid that struck Earth 66 million years ago. It supports concepts presented in the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died.

Determining the Size and Energy of the K-T Asteroid

This activity allows students to calculate the mass, size, and kinetic energy of an asteroid that struck Earth 66 million years ago, based on the total abundance of iridium in a sediment layer. It supports concepts presented in the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died.

The Principle of Isostasy

This video provides a demonstration of the principle of isostasy, the idea that the continental crust “floats” on the underlying mantle.