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Can blood from coronavirus survivors treat the newly ill?

Hospitals are gearing up to test if a century-old treatment used to fight off flu and measles outbreaks in the days before vaccines, and tried more recently against SARS and Ebola, just might work for COVID-19, too: using blood donated from patients who’ve recovered.

The Science of an Extreme Animal Athlete

This video follows biologist Shane Campbell-Staton, who is studying the adaptations that allow deer mice living at high elevations to stay warm and active during the winter.

Scientists rethink Alzheimer’s, diversifying the drug search

When researchers at the University of Kentucky compare brains donated from people who died with dementia, very rarely do they find one that bears only Alzheimer’s trademark plaques and tangles — no other damage. That hard-won lesson helps explain how scientists are rethinking Alzheimer’s.

Photosynthesis

This multipart animation series explores the process of photosynthesis and the structures that carry it out.

Mapping the Darién Gap

This video describes how indigenous communities from the tropical rainforest of Darién, Panama, use drones to map their lands. The communities use these maps to protect their territories from outside incursions and to design sustainable land-use plans.

Cystic Fibrosis Mechanism and Treatment

This animation shows how mutations in an ion channel protein lead to the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. The animation also discusses how research on this protein has been used to develop treatments for the disease.

Think Like a Scientist: Gorongosa

This video describes a large-scale project to restore the wildlife of Gorongosa National Park. The video highlights the project’s approach of combining traditional conservation biology with solutions for addressing challenges in the community.

Seed Dispersal and Habitat Fragmentation

This video follows scientists studying the seeds that brown spider monkeys disperse in a tropical forest of Colombia in order to inform and improve reforestation efforts.

Science Says: Unavoidable typos in DNA help fuel cancer

Cancer patients often wonder “why me?” Does their tumor run in the family? Did they try hard enough to avoid risks like smoking, too much sun or a bad diet? New research suggests random chance may play a bigger role than people realize.