1 - 12 of 123 results
Red Tattoo

This activity explores an image of tattoo ink particles inside cells, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about the structure and color of human skin.

Mozambique Mounds

This activity explores an image of termite mounds in the African savanna, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about ecosystems, competition, and feedback loops.

Photosynthesis

This multipart animation series explores the process of photosynthesis and the structures that carry it out.

Why Two Heads?

This activity explores images of planarians regenerating missing body parts, which serve as phenomena for learning about cell division and differentiation.

Mate Choice in Spiders

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated how males in a species of sexually cannibalistic spiders choose their mates.

Cancer and Cell Fate

Keri Shingleton explains how she uses the BioInteractive animation on cancer and cell fate to spark curiosity in her students and encourage exploration of a topic.

Cancer Cell Invasion

This activity explores an image of tumor cells invading muscle tissue, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about cancer, mutations, and cell division.

Sequencing HHMI BioInteractive Cancer Resources

Why don’t we have a cure for cancer? In this blog post, higher ed instructor Holly Basta discusses how she sequences BioInteractive cancer resources to get her students to think about big questions in how cell division is regulated — and how understanding regulation can guide drug design.

Cystic Fibrosis Mechanism and Treatment

This animation shows how mutations in an ion channel protein lead to the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. The animation also discusses how research on this protein has been used to develop treatments for the disease.

Monkey Social Status and Immune Response

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study on how social status affects the expression of genes involved in immune system processes.