1 - 12 of 38 results
Wildebeest Populations

This activity explores an image of a wildebeest herd on the Serengeti, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about population dynamics and wildlife management.

Patterns of Predation

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated how herbivore populations are regulated in the Serengeti.

Mozambique Mounds

This activity explores an image of termite mounds in the African savanna, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about ecosystems, competition, and feedback loops.

Skin Color and Human Evolution

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated genetic factors contributing to skin color differences, particularly within African populations.

Monkey Social Status and Immune Response

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study on how social status affects the expression of genes involved in immune system processes.

Modeling Trophic Cascades

In this activity, students model trophic cascades, which are also explored in a variety of related resources, using cards of animal and plant species from seven different habitats.

Ecology, Food Webs, and the Chesapeake Bay

In this talk, scientists Beth McGee, Mary Power, and Brian Silliman discuss the Chesapeake Bay, its food web, and the challenges of conserving and restoring the Bay.

Snail Fronts and Salt Marsh Die-Offs

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated whether periwinkle snails contribute to salt marsh die-offs.

Cell Division and Cancer Risk

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated how random mutations during cell division can contribute to cancer.

HIV Receptors and Co-receptors

This demonstration models the first step of the HIV life cycle: the binding of HIV envelope proteins to receptors on human helper T cells.

Trophic Cascades in Rivers

In this talk, ecologist Mary Power discusses how herbivorous fish and their predators contribute to the regulation of aquatic ecosystems.