1 - 12 of 25 results
Data Explorer

This web tool provides a quick and easy way of visualizing and analyzing data without advanced technological requirements. 

Lionfish Invasion: Density-Dependent Population Dynamics

In this Click & Learn, students explore mathematical models that describe how populations change over time and apply these models to the invasive lionfish population in the Bahamas. They also use data from other species to learn how density-dependent factors limit population size.

Human Origins

This interactive module allows students to examine fossils of early humans and compare them to modern primates.

Exploring Biomass Pyramids

This interactive module allows students to collect and analyze data from a virtual river to construct biomass and energy pyramids.

Tiktaalik Fossil: Skull

This model shows the skull of Tiktaalik, a vertebrate that existed about 375 million years ago and had features of both fish and tetrapods (four-limbed animals).

Tiktaalik Fossil: Body

This model shows the skeleton of Tiktaalik, a vertebrate that existed about 375 million years ago and had features of both fish and tetrapods (four-limbed animals).

Tiktaalik Fossil: Pectoral Fin

This model shows the pectoral fin bones of Tiktaalik, a vertebrate that existed about 375 million years ago and had features of both fish and tetrapods (four-limbed animals).

Tiktaalik Fossil: Pelvis

This model shows the pelvis of Tiktaalik, a vertebrate that existed about 375 million years ago and had features of both fish and tetrapods (four-limbed animals).

Tiktaalik Fossil: Humerus

This model shows the humerus bone of Tiktaalik, a vertebrate that existed about 375 million years ago and had features of both fish and tetrapods (four-limbed animals).

Population Dynamics

This interactive simulation allows students to explore two classic mathematical models that describe how populations change over time: the exponential and logistic growth models.

Exploring Trophic Cascades

This interactive module explores examples of how changes in one species can affect species at other trophic levels and ultimately the entire ecosystem.