1 - 12 of 14 results
Nutrient Cycling in the Serengeti

In this activity, students engage with an example from the Serengeti ecosystem to illustrate the exchange of nutrients between plants, animals, and the environment. 

Diving Adaptations in Sea Nomads

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated physiological and genetic adaptations in the Bajau, a group of people who traditionally do freediving.

Monkey Social Status and Immune Response

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study on how social status affects the expression of genes involved in immune system processes.

Living Together

This activity explores images of the bobtail squid, which serve as phenomena for learning about symbiosis and interspecies interactions.

Modeling Food Webs in Darién, Panama

In this activity, students use cards to build model food webs and evaluate how ecological disturbances affect each trophic level using information from the citizen science website WildCam Darién.

HIV Receptors and Co-receptors

This demonstration models the first step of the HIV life cycle: the binding of HIV envelope proteins to receptors on human helper T cells.

Activity for Some Animals are More Equal than Others

This activity explores the content and research discussed in the film Some Animals are More Equal than Others, which tells the story of the ecologists who first documented the role of keystone species in ecosystem regulation.

How Novel Icefish Genes Can Improve Human Health

This lesson supports concepts covered in the film The Birth and Death of Genes. After watching the film and reading a couple of scientific passages, students explain how understanding about icefish adaptations might help develop treatments for health conditions.

Activity for The Birth and Death of Genes

This activity explores the research presented in the short film The Making of the Fittest: The Birth and Death of Genes, which illustrates how gene duplications and mutations have allowed some fish to adapt to extreme environments.