1 - 12 of 18 results
Evolution of Ant-Mimicking Beetles

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that explored the evolutionary origins of parasitic beetles that mimic army ants.

Sodium Channel Evolution in Electric Fish

This activity guides the analysis of a published scientific figure from a study that investigated how gene duplication contributed to the evolution of electric fish.

Why Two Heads?

This activity explores images of planarians regenerating missing body parts, which serve as phenomena for learning about cell division and differentiation.

Ebola: Disease Detectives

This hands-on activity allows students to analyze DNA sequences of Ebola viruses. Students use these sequences to track the virus’s spread during the 2013–2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Written in Chalk

This activity explores images of chalk formations and coccolithophores, which serve as phenomena for learning about the interactions between biological and geological processes.

Synchronized Division

This activity explores an image of early embryonic cells, which serves as a phenomenon for learning about cell division and development.

Activity for The Origin of Tetrapods

This activity explores the concepts and research presented in the short film Great Transitions: The Origin of Tetrapods. The film describes the discovery of Tiktaalik, a key fossil that illuminates the evolutionary history of four-legged animals.

Using DNA to Explore Lizard Phylogeny

In this activity, students explore the phenomenon of convergent evolution presented in the short film The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree. They build and interpret phylogenetic trees to infer how certain adaptations evolved among the Anole lizard populations of the Car

Activity for Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

This activity explores the concepts and research on the anole lizards discussed in the short film The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree, including adaptation by natural selection, convergent evolution, and the formation of new species.

Finding the Crater

This activity supports concepts covered in the film The Day the Mesozoic Died. Students will analyze geological evidence from ten different sites around the world to predict the location of the asteroid impact that caused the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period.

Weighing the Evidence for a Mass Extinction: On Land

This activity supports concepts covered in the short film The Day the Mesozoic Died. Students analyze graphs and data on pollen grains and fern spores to form a picture of the living landscape before and after the mass extinction that marked the end of the age of the dinosaurs.