Hear how experienced science educators are using BioInteractive resources with their students. Discover implementation ideas, lesson sequences, resource modifications, quick tips, and more in this collection of videos and in-depth articles. Browse, search, and filter by format, teaching topic, level, and science topic to find resources relevant to specific courses and student populations.

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1 - 7 of 7 results
Inspiring Students Through Great Films

Today’s world is full of pessimism and cynicism, and our students are bombarded with discouraging messages about the future of the planet. Is there any antidote to such poison? In this message from BioInteractive, hear from Vice President for Science Education Sean B.

Using BioInteractive to Generate Assessment Items

Interested in how to embed assessments into your instruction? In this blog post, hear from Wisconsin educator Amy Fassler as she discusses how she embeds formative assessments in a lesson sequence about trophic cascades, including an example claim-evidence-reasoning task.

Stopping Mosquito-Borne Disease Click & Learn

Amy Fassler explains how she uses BioInteractive's Stopping Mosquito-Borne Disease Click & Learn to introduce the topic of emerging infectious disease in her AP® Environmental Science course.

Coral Bleaching

Scott Sowell describes how he uses the coral bleaching animation and activity to teach his ecology students about the effects of global warming, while also integrating math and graphing skills into his lesson.

The Guide

David Hong describes how he uses the short film The Guide with his AP® Environmental Science students to introduce the topic of conservation biology and challenges faced by nature reserves, such as Gorongosa National Park.

Gorongosa Interactive Timeline

Amanda Briody describes two BioInteractive resources focused on Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique. She uses the short film The Guide to introduce students to the park and its scientists.