Browse news articles connected to BioInteractive classroom resources to infuse current events into science teaching. The articles come from trusted news outlets, such as the Associated Press (AP) and The Atlantic, and other sources chosen for use in the classroom.

37 - 46 of 46 results
Price tag on gene therapy for rare form of blindness: $850K

A first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000 per patient, making it one of the most expensive medicines in the world and raising questions about the affordability of a coming wave of similar gene-targeting therapies.

In a milestone year, gene therapy finds its place in medicine

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S.

Gene therapy for rare form of blindness wins US approval

U.S. health officials on Tuesday approved the nation’s first gene therapy for an inherited disease, a treatment that improves the sight of patients with a rare form of blindness. It marks another major advance for the emerging field of genetic medicine.

Me, Myself, and a Hundred Trillion: Dining with your Gut Microbiome

Do you really want to eat that second slice of cake?

Oh, no — you look great! I only ask because it may not actually be you who wants it.

Let me explain. What if I told you that there were a few trillion extra cells inside your body scarfing down the food you eat, cont

Science Says: Era of monster hurricanes roiling the Atlantic

It’s not just this year. The monster hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, Jose and Lee that have raged across the Atlantic are contributing to what appears to be the most active period for major storms on record.

And the busiest part of hurricane season isn’t even over.

Lab-made “mini organs” helping doctors treat cystic fibrosis

Els van der Heijden, who has cystic fibrosis, was finding it ever harder to breathe as her lungs filled with thick, sticky mucus. Despite taking more than a dozen pills and inhalers a day, the 53-year-old had to stop working and scale back doing the thing she loved best, horseback riding.

Science Says: Fast-melting Arctic sign of bad global warming

One of the coldest places on Earth is so hot it’s melting.

Glaciers, sea ice and a massive ice sheet in the Arctic are thawing from toasty air above and warm water below. The northern polar region is heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet and that’s setting off alarm bel

Science Says: Unavoidable typos in DNA help fuel cancer

Cancer patients often wonder “why me?” Does their tumor run in the family? Did they try hard enough to avoid risks like smoking, too much sun or a bad diet? New research suggests random chance may play a bigger role than people realize.