Browse news articles connected to BioInteractive classroom resources to infuse current events into science teaching. The articles come from trusted news outlets, such as the Associated Press (AP) and The Atlantic, and other sources chosen for use in the classroom.

1 - 12 of 13 results
Library of spider silk could hold secrets for new materials

A lab at the American Museum of Natural History is uncovering the genes behind each type of spider silk to create a sort of “silk library.” It’s part of an effort to learn how spiders make so many kinds of silk and what allows each kind to behave differently.

Doctors use HIV in gene therapy to fix ‘bubble boy’ disease

They were born without a working germ-fighting system, every infection a threat to their lives. Now eight babies with “bubble boy disease” have had it fixed by a gene therapy made from one of the immune system’s worst enemies — HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Chinese researcher claims first gene-edited babies

A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life. If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics. A U.S.

Science Says: Gene editing widely used in range of research

Gene editing is getting fresh attention thanks to a successful lab experiment with human embryos. But for all the angst over possibly altering reproduction years from now, this technology already is used by scientists every day in fields ranging from agriculture to drug development.

Gene therapy for rare form of blindness wins US approval

U.S. health officials on Tuesday approved the nation’s first gene therapy for an inherited disease, a treatment that improves the sight of patients with a rare form of blindness. It marks another major advance for the emerging field of genetic medicine.

Lab-made “mini organs” helping doctors treat cystic fibrosis

Els van der Heijden, who has cystic fibrosis, was finding it ever harder to breathe as her lungs filled with thick, sticky mucus. Despite taking more than a dozen pills and inhalers a day, the 53-year-old had to stop working and scale back doing the thing she loved best, horseback riding.